Sheldon-Watson-Genealogy
The Genealogy of the Sheldon and Watson Families
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Aleva Sevilla Lohr[1, 2]

Female 1834 - 1914  (80 years)


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  • Name Aleva Sevilla Lohr  [3
    Born 20 Jun 1834  Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Gender Female 
    Died 25 Dec 1914 
    Person ID P-108077225  SheldonTurner
    Last Modified 14 Feb 2011 

    Father Henry Lore,   b. 20 Mar 1807, Somerset Co., PA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Feb 1852, Knox County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Mother Eliza Porter,   d. Bef 1836, Ohio. USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship Natural 
    Married 5 Jan 1832  Knox County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Family ID F287  Group Sheet

    Family George Washington Sheldon,   b. 16 Jun 1834, , Holmes County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 May 1906, Hubbard, Hardin, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Married 4 Nov 1854  , Holmes County, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Children 
     1. Melissa Ann Sheldon,   b. 1 Aug 1855, Ohio. USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. William Henry Sheldon,   b. 5 Oct 1857,   d. 1 Oct 1935  (Age 77 years)
     3. Loretta Jane Sheldon,   b. 18 Nov 1859,   d. 14 Mar 1933  (Age 73 years)
     4. Aleva Catherine Sheldon,   b. 23 Feb 1862,   d. 16 Aug 1863  (Age 1 years)
     5. George D Sheldon,   b. 18 Jun 1864, Iowa City, Wright, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Feb 1949, Radcliff, Hardin, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
    +6. Leonard Lee Sheldon,   b. 23 Sep 1866, Hubbard, Hardin County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Jan 1947, Denver, Denver, Colorado Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     7. Ida May Sheldon,   b. 31 Jul 1870,   d. Yes, date unknown
     8. John L. B. Sheldon,   b. 3 Sep 1872, Eldora, Hardin, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Nov 1963, Eldora, Hardin, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years)
     9. Thomas Leslie Sheldon,   b. 19 Apr 1875,   d. Yes, date unknown
     10. Bertha Bell Sheldon,   b. 15 Apr 1881,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Family ID F1  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    George S. Sheldon home in Iowa
    George S. Sheldon home in Iowa

  • Notes 
    • Her last name has been spelled at least two different ways both Lohr and Lore
      (Research):listed in 1850 Census as Susan.

      1850 Wedding
      In many states in 1850, the law dictated that the intention of marriage should be made public three weeks or more before the ceremony. Usually a wedding bill or announcement was posted in a public place proclaiming the future nuptials. If the wedding was not held in a church, it took place outside the bride’s family home. Anyone who saw the bill was invited to attend the festivities.

      Following the ceremony, men shot guns and banged tin pans to make noise and begin the celebration. An 1850 wedding celebration typically included a feast, dancing, games, and hazing the bride and groom!
      In 1850, weddings were a day-long celebration. The engaged couple was married in the local church or at the bride's home. Following the ceremony the bride's parents hosted a celebratory feast for all of the guests. The women prepared a feast of favorite foods. Often women put pine boughs over the outside doors for decoration and made bouquets of fresh flowers for the bride and for decorations. They also made a special wedding cake recipe, and decorated the cake with fresh flowers.

      In 1850, pioneer women made candles to light the house at night and in winter months. Most candles were made from beef fat (tallow) and beeswax. The beef fat was cheap and readily available, but burned very quickly. They added beeswax when possible to make the candles burn longer. The women melted the tallow and beeswax in a large iron pot and dipped string in and out until it was coated enough to make a candle. They hung the candles to dry and harden. Some households used candle molds, which were quicker to use and made more uniform candles.

      Pioneer Home Schooling

      "Since the teacher's salary is not an adequate means of livelihood, teachers also farm in addition to their teaching. Anyone who wishes can teach." --Sjoerd Sipma, 1848

      For pioneer parents who wanted a basic education for their children, getting one wasn't easy.

      When Iowa became a state, it had a system for paying teachers. Each township was divided into 36 sections. Each section numbered 16 was designated as school property. A county official was assigned to sell the land and put the money aside in an interest bearing account. The interest was used to pay the teachers. A teacher's salary depended on whether the teacher was a man or a woman, as well as how many children he or she taught. On average, male teachers earned $19.73 per month by 1854.

      In addition to this salary, parents paid a $2 "subscription" for each student they sent to the three month, winter school session. Generally, schools didn't form until there were enough children in an area to warrant organizing one.

      Teachers boarded with families during the months they taught, rotating from household to household. This wasn't the most harmonious arrangement. Many schools had serious discipline problems when older students attended. Sometimes arguments caused parents to pull their children's "subscriptions," leaving too few students to keep the school open.

      In May 1854, the citizens and teachers organized a state teachers' association in Muscatine, Iowa. Its purpose was to promote education in the state, regulate the quality of teachers, and elevate the status of the teaching profession.

      Even if everything went smoothly, a student usually stopped attending school between ages 12 and 14, and what students learned was limited by the teacher's knowledge. If parents were educated, they could supplement their children's spelling, reading, writing, and figuring at home with whatever books they owned.

  • Sources 
    1. [S1017492645] Iowa 1850 Pioneer Farms, (http://www.lhf.org/cgi-bin/gygsite.pl?2~0; Sept 26 2006).

    2. [S1018088622] Ancestry Family Trees, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.), Ancestry Family Trees.
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13204573&pid=-108077225

    3. [S1025548592] 1910 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Thirteenth Census of the United), Year: 1910; Census Place: Tipton, Hardin, Iowa; Roll: ; Page: ; Enumeration District: ; Image: ..
      Birth date: abt 1837Birth place: OhioResidence date: 1910Residence place: Tipton, Hardin, Iowa

    4. End Marriage: Widower

    5. [S1017492672] Holmes County Marriage Books; FHL #0477144.